You're Committing To The Process, Not The Goal

A well-formed goal is a vector. The end result is the direction. The process by which you get there is the magnitude. With no process, it doesn't matter what direction you head; the end result is always zero movement.

Most of the time, we focus on the end result when defining what we want. We want to have six-pack abs, to have a successful business, to have 100,000 followers on Twitter. There are two main problems with this. These goals are:

  1. Ultimately not within your control, and
  2. Do nothing to address how to achieve that goal

A well-formed goal is a vector: there is both a magnitude and direction. The end result is the direction. The process by which you get there is the magnitude. With no process, it doesn't matter what direction you head; the end result is always zero movement.

Focus on how you will achieve that goal, and ensure that you are willing to put in the effort required. You may want six-pack abs, but are you willing to exercise every day and uphold the dietary regimen required, even on days you don't want to? You may want 100,000 followers on Twitter, but are you willing to put in the hours to create quality content on a regular basis, interact with your followers, and put up with the drama that inevitably comes from being a public figure on the internet?

The only guarantee with these goals is that you will need to invest time and effort (and possibly money) into the process. The goal isn't guaranteed. You need to be willing to commit to a process that may never result in your goal being fulfilled.